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How to battle slowgrind #bruteforce attacks against #msexchange #windows server #remotedesktop #sharepoint with #Syspeace

Syspeace automatically blocks attacks that occur according to the rules.
The default rule is that if an intruder fails to login more than 5 times within 30 minutes, the intruders IP address is blocked, tracked and reported for 2 hours and simply is denied any access to the server.

A new trend though has emerged and that is for bruteforce attackers to “slowgrind” through servers, trying to stay “under the radar” really from IDS/IPS HIPS/HIDS such as Syspeace.
They’ve got thousands and thousands of computers at their disposal so they’ll basically just try a few times at each server and then move on to next one in the IP range or geographical location hoping not to trigger any alarms or hacker countermeasures in place.

An easy way to battle this is actually simply to change the default rule in Syspeace from the time windows of 30 minutes to for example 5 days.

This way , I’m pretty sure you’ll see there are quite a few attackers that only tried 2 or three times a couple of days ago and they’re back again but still only trying only a few times.

With the “5 day” windows, you’ll catch and block those attacks too.

Here’s actually a brilliant example of an attack blocked, using a 4 day window.

Blocked address 121.31.114.99() [China] 2014-08-11 15:06:00
Rule used (Winlogon):
        Name:                   Catch All Login
        Trigger window:         4.00:30:00
        Occurrences:            5
        Lockout time:           02:00:00
        Previous observations of this IP address:
        2014-08-11 13:05:51     aksabadministrator
        2014-08-10 22:06:48     aksabadministrator
        2014-08-10 06:39:12     aksabadministrator
        2014-08-09 15:39:52     aksabadministrator
        2014-08-09 00:32:05     aksabadministrator

Syspeace has blocked more than 3 285 300 intrusion attempts against Windows Servers worldwide so far.

#infosec VPS and #Cloud servers used for brute force attacks and #botnets against #WinServ and #MSExchange

Syspeace - intrusion prevention for Windows servers

Syspeace website

Is your VPS used for brute force attacks?

or I could also have called this post “Do you know whom your VPS is hacking today?”

A trend that has surfaced over the years is to simply hire computer power inte the Cloud in various forms and shapes. The basic idea is to get rid of the hardware and maintenance för servers and have someone else take care of it. Also known as Infrastructure aa a Service or IaaS

The problem is often though that even if you use a hosted VPS you still have to manage it. This is something that a lot of users and companies tend to forget or neglect.

What you’ve basically done is simply get rid of the hardware hassle but you still have to take care of the Windows patching and manage security issues as with any Windows serevr (or Linux för that matter) .

There aren’t that many Cloyd services out there that actually will also manage the security and management aspects of your VPS and you really need to think these things through.

The resaon for this post is that for some time now, a VPS located at a Swedish Cloud Service provider has been trying to brute force its way into quite a few different servers with #Syspeace installed on them.
The attacks, targeted aginst RDP / Terminal Servers servers, Exchange Server and Sharepoint Servers in this case, have been blocked, traced and reported automatically but the big question is whether whoever owns/hires this VPS is actually even aware of what is going on ? Or if it’s hired especially for this purpose? This is actuallt impossible to know.

In this specific case this VPS has been going on and on for a while and it has targeted at least 5 different customers of mine with Syspeace installed and about 12 servers at least.
All attacks have been succesfully blocked, tracked and reported and eventually this VPS will end up in the Syspeace Global Blacklist (GBL) and propagated to all other Syspeace installations around the world and it will be blacklisted for all of them, thus securing them preemptively from any brute force / dictionary attacks from this VPS.

Most likely the Cloud Service Provider doesn’t know what’s going on since it’s not their responsibility really. Maybe the user / customer hirong the VPS does this on pyrpose or they have no idea that the VPS has been compromised and is used for this hacking activity. I juyt donät knoew. All I know is that it has been cinducting a lot of dicitionary attacks lately.

What I’m driving at is that if you decide to start using a hosted VPS, you still have the responsibility to manage it as any other server really.
You need to have it correctly patched, have an antivirus on it, make sure all security settings are correct and you need to monitor activity on it.

You should also ask your Cloud Service provider for intrusion prevention from Syspeace since you basically have no idea what all of the other customers VPS are really doing in your shared network since you hae no control over them.

Most Cloud Service Provers could inplement Syspeace in their various Applications portals or have a Syspeace installed in their prepared images for customers. If your providers hasn’t implemented Syspeace yet, you can simply download it yourself from /free-download/download-plus-getting-started-with-syspeace/

Your “neighbors” at the Cloud Service could be trying to brute force they way into your VPS and you’d probably wouldn’t have a clue if you haven’t turned on logging and installed a brute foce prevention software for Windows servers.

By Juha Jurvanen @ JufCorp

#Infosec When and where is Syspeace useful for intrusion prevention ?

In what scenarios Syspeace is useful for preventing brute force attacks? Do I need it if I’ve only got a Windows workstation?

Syspeace - intrusion prevention for Windows servers

Syspeace website

Syspeace is an intrusion prevention software mainly targeted for Windows Servers, SBS Server, RDS TS Servers, RDWeb, Sharepoint Servers, SQL Server, Exchange, Sharepoint, Citrix and so on but it will also run on Windows 7 and above for home use.

To have a real use for Syspeace these conditions need to be met

1. You need to have enabled remote access to your server / workstation.

2. You need to have set up some kind of portforwarding in your external firewall to your server / workstation. If you are for instance on a standard broadband connection and you haven’t done anything with the default rules in your boradband modem, your workstation is probably not reachable from the Internet thus making a Syspeace installation quite unecessary and waste of RAM and COPU for you, minimal of course but still. There is no need to have software installed in any computer environment that actually doesn’t do anything for you. It’s a waste of resources.  

3.The same goes for servers although in a server environment you might want to have Syspeace installed to monitor and handle internal brute force attacks since Syspeace works just as efficently whetheter the attack is externla or internal. It will even block a workstation trying to connect to netowrk shares via the command prompt using “net use * \servernamesharename” command. Have a look at his entry for instance http://syspeace.wordpress.com/2013/09/25/syspeace-for-internal-brute-force-protection-on-windows-servers/

4. There could be a scenario where you have for instance your own hosted WorPress Blog that is reachable from the Internet . Please refer to http://syspeace.wordpress.com/2013/04/24/syspeace-for-protecting-wordpress-from-brute-force-attacks/ for an idea on brute force prevention for WordPress Blogs.

5. In server envirenments you might have Syspeace installed not only for intrusion prevention but also to have a good reporting on various user login activity that can be viewed and exported in the Access Reports Section.

6. If you’re using mainly Cloud Services or a managed VPS ,the intrusion prevention should be handled by your Cloud Service Provider . Here’s an older blog post on how to have verify how your provider handles hacking attacks : http://syspeace.wordpress.com/2012/11/19/securing-cloud-services-from-dictionary-attacks-hack-yourself/

There is a fully functional, free 30 day trial for download at /free-download/download-plus-getting-started-with-syspeace/ .
Give it a try and have your Windows Server instantly protected from dictionary attacks and brute force attacks. The installtion is small, quick and very easu to set up. You’re up & running in 5 minutes and there’s no need to chnage your current infrasctructure, invest in specific and usually expensive hardware or hire external consultants.

By Juha Jurvanen @ JufCorp

Using Syspeace also for internal protection and access reporting.

Using Syspeace for internal server protection

Most Syspeace users have the software in place to protect them from mainly from external threats from the Internet such as hacking attempts via bruteforce attacks and dictionary attacks.

Quite often, the internal netowrk ranges are excluded in the local whitelist by sysadmins , thus never blocking anything from those IP addresses or network ranges.

Some of our customers though have also discovered Syspeace to be an excellent tool to keep track of failed internal logins and those might actualy be important to keep track of.

If you’re not keeping track of internal failed login attempts, it might be hard to spot for instance a virus/trojan infected PC on your network that tries to login to every PC and server that is available or if a user is trying to access servers or assets they’re not supposed to. With Syspeace, the attack is automatically blocked, reported and and the sysadmin is alerted that something’s going on.

There can be downsides to not excluding internal IP ranges since there is a risk of for instance blocking a server from communicating with another but if you’re vigilant and think these things through, it’s mostly an administrative task to remember that yov’ve got Syspeace when you’ve changeed an administrators password or whatever.

Creating reports on user logins

Another great feature of Syspeace is the reporting section that enables for sysadmins to create reports and staistics about user logins such as when, from where and even hof often from that locationc they’ve actually been logged in.

For instance, if a user claims to have been working from home in July, it’s quite easy for a sysadmin to actually verify this using the Access Reports section to create .csv files with statistics.
Now, if the IP address for instance originates from Spain and your company is located only in Sweden…

If you’re using a Windows Server-based Cloud Service for instance, it might be difficult for you to get hold of such information, even if you ask for it.

Howerver, if your cloud Service provider is running Syspeace to protect you and other customers it’s a walk in the park for the provider to get you that infomation if you need it for some reason.

Syspeace stores failed and successful login in a local database so even the Windows securiy eventlog is cleared , the information can still be obtained by Syspeace.

Download a free, fully functional trial at / and have your Windows, Citrix, RDS, Sharepoint, Exchange, OWA, RDWEB, SQL servers and more instantly protected from hacking attempts.

By Juha Jurvanen

Syspeace logo

Syspeace – Intrusion prevention for Windows Servers

Preview of the new Acces Reports feature in the upcoming Syspeace

This is a sneak preview of a new feature in the upcoming Syspeace to make sysadmins also be able to search, sort, create and export various reports to .CSV files on login activity on their Windows servers.

There will be even more things in the reporting and sorting functionality when we release it

Syspeace protects Windows servers, Exchange Servers, Remote Desktop Services, Citrix Servers, Sharepoint servers and more from brute force and dictionary attacks.
Syspeace works on Windows Server 2003, 2008 , 2088 R2 and SBS versions and an officially supported Windows Server 2012 and SQl Server support is underway,

For a free , fully functional trial please see Syspeace download

How to setup syspeace for rdp – intrusion prevention for Windows servers

This is actually just a post based on some of the search terms that have led to people finding this blog.

So,

how to setup syspeace for rdp

..
Actually , it might take you longer to read this blogentry than actualy set it up.

1. Go to the Syspeace website and download the software at /downloads.aspx

2. Read the requiremnets in the manual:

System requirements
Operating system: Windows 7, Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2008/2008 R2 (32 or 64 bit), Windows Small Business Server SBS 2008 and so on . (We are currently working on the Windows Server 2012 validation and we have tested it successfully but in certain scenarios the source IP address isn’t displayed in the evenlog. This is a Windows Server issue)
.Net 4 (if not installed, it wil be installed for you )
1GB free disk, minimum 500M RAM.
Auditing
Auditing for failed login and successful log in switched on in local security policy or in the group policy for the domain. This will enable events in the event-log that Syspeace listens for.
Firewall
The built-in firewall in Windows must be up and running.

3. Install Syspeace which is quite straight forward

4. Start the GUI and type in a valid mailaddress to get your 30 day free trial license key emailed to you. This emai address is also going to be the account emai you need tp use when purchasing the license.

4. Paste the license number and the GUI will start.

5. By default, the Syspace service is NOT started.

6. Cllick teh Settings button and review the default rules (called the “Catcha all” rule” and alse set up messaging for blocked attacks (whom to alert, whom to emai license inforamtkion and so on )

7. Close the Settings section. Click the “START” butto and you’re done.

Now, your Windows server is instantly protected from brute force and dictionary attacks against youe Exchange Webmail OWA, Terminal Servers on RDP (terminal services, remote desktop services, remote app sessions) and the webinterface called RDWEB, your Sharepoint login , your Citrix server, winlogon services and even more.

There’s really not that much more to it.
Since the intrusion prevention for Syspeace monitor the Windows Server Evnetlog , it doens’t matter if you have set up RDP on other ports or if you are using a proxy. Sysoeace is a HIDS (Host Instrusion Protection System) thus eliminating the need for separate hardware, expensive consulans and redesigning you infrastructure.

Just sit back and start recieving resports and emails when an attack is blocked, tracked and reported.