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Syspeace for internal brute force protection on Windows Servers

After installing Syspeace , the tech guys started getting notifications that their Exchange Server was trying to login to another server and it was rejected. There was no reason for this server to do so whatsoever and it had not been noticed earlier so it’s hard to say when it actually started.

After disabling the whitelist for the LAN at the customer site they started getting mail notifications that every workstation on their LAN was actually trying to login to various servers using various usernames and password, hence a brute force attack/dictionary attack from the inside.

Most likely a trojan has been planted somewhere and it has infected the rest.

This is a fairly simple example of how Syspeace can actually reveal a security breach a customer wasn’t even aware of had occured.

It is totally up to any customer to use whitelists for the LAN but as a precaution, I personnally wouldn’t recommend it since it acutally gives you a great heads up that something has happened if a computer or multiple computers suddenly starts to try and login to servers they’re not supposed to.

As a system administrator, you get the chance to get attack automatically blocked, logged, traced and reported and you can have a closer at the computer responsible for the attack or have a word the user to see what’s going on.

You can even create extensive reports on all activity originating from that user or computer using the Access Reports section in Syspeace to get a more clear view on how long it’s been trying and so on.

Since Syspeace automatically protects failed logins using Winlogon authentication, your Windows servers are also protected from computers/users trying to use the “net use” or “map network drive” with invalid logon credentials trying to acces shares they’re not supposed to.

If you don’t have processes in place for scanning logs, saving them and monitoring every login activity, it will become grusome task to even know if there’s something going on at all. You simply won’t have the tools to do so.

Have your own servers run the fully functional Syspeace free trial and see if you get any unexpected login failures from the internal network and from Internet.
You might be surprised.

By Juha Jurvanen

Securing Cloud services from dictionary attacks – hack yourself and check your Cloud providers / outsourcing providers security and response

The more we move our data to various Cloud services and to outsourcing companies, we also need to take the consequences into account what that means from a security perspective.

Prior to a move to Cloud services, a company could keep track of how communications are secured, they could set their own account lockout policies and monitor all logfiles in order to keep security at the desired level.

With the popularity of Cloud services becoming more widespread, a lot of the possibilities for this kind of control and tightened security has disappeared. As a Cloud user you rarely get any indication that someone is for instance trying to use your username and password to gain access to your, for instance , your Microsoft Exchange Webmail , also called OWA.

A hacker can probably try to guess your password with a brute force attack or dictionary attack for quite some time and nothing really happens. The protective measures at the Cloud service provider are most likely unknown to you and you will not get a notification of that something might be going on.

An easy way for you to verify this is actually to try hack yourself. By this I mean, try to login to you account but with an invalid password. See what happens. Is your account locked out? Does the OWA disappear for you, indicating your IP address has been locked down by some security countermeasure?
Are you as a customer and user notified and alerted in any way of the attempt? This is of course also a simple test you can do against you own companys webmail if you want to, although the server team won’t like it when you point out the problem.

Keep in mind that it would take quite some time to do each logon manually but hackers don’t do this manually. They use special software for this that is freely available for download and they can render thousands and thousands logon attempts in  few minutes.

From the Cloud Service provider point of view, this has been a big problem for years. Brute force prevention and dictionary attack prevention on especially the Windows server platform has always come with lots of manual labor and high costs so it’s usually not even dealt with.

From the user point of view, there’s not that much you can do about it reslly more than verify what happens if you try and then ask your service provider for a solution if you’re not happy with the result after hacking yourself.

If you’re running Virtual Private Servers (VPS) with Windows you should consider this also but as a Cloud Service provider should.

As an important piece of the puzzle of the security systems that need to be in place, and as a natural part of the server baseline security configuration, have a look at Syspeace , an easy to use, easy to deploy and configure brute force prevention software that automatically blocks the intruders IP address,tracks it and reports it to the system administrator. Without causing the legitimate users account to be locked out and with no manual intervention at all.

Syspeace works by monitoring the servers eventlogs and is triggered by unsuccesful login attempts as alerted by a process called Windows Authentication.

With this method, there is out of the box protection for Citrix, Microsoft Terminal Server, Sharepoint, Exchange Server and more. There is also a Global Blacklist, offering preemptive protection from well known hackers around the world.

If you’re a Cloud Service provider or if you running or hosting any Windows servers you want protected, download a free trial from Syspeace trial download and see for yourself how easily you can get rid of a big problem and, at a low cost.


Posted with WordPress for Android.
Juha Jurvanen
Senior IT consultant in backup, server operations, security and cloud. Syspeace reseller in Sweden.

JufCorp

Preventing and blocking brute force and dictionary attacks in a Windows Server environment with Syspeace

Syspeace is an automated brute force prevention / dictionary attack software that protects Microsoft Windows Servers by monitoring the Windows Authentication mechanisms for unsuccessful logins.

 

This means that you get immediate protection for Microsoft Terminal Server, Citrix, Exchange OWA Webmail , SharePoint, CRM, Terminal Server RDWeb and more, for instance there is also built in protection for Exchange connectors.

Each attack is automatically blocked, tracked and reported and as a system administrator you set up your own rules on when to block and for how long.

Syspeace is easy to install and you’re up & running and protected within minutes of the download. No need for changing your infrastructure, buy costly new appliances or hire specialized consultants.

The Global Blacklist that is shared among all Syspeace installation around the world gives you preemptive protectionfrom well known hackers and ddos attackers, blocking them even before an attack can be initiated.

Syspeace also contain reporting capabilities, giving you the ability to check for failed and successful logins for your servers and separated mail notifcations based on events.

The Syspeace licensing model is very flexible and and targeted to be easily affordable for any company, whether you’re n the SMB segment, a large enterprise or even a large Cloud Service Provider or an outsourcing company.

One of the goals for Syspeace is to become a natural part of every servers installed security mechanisms as part of the baseline security and an important piece of that security work is

Windows 2003 version of Syspeace is underway to also provide brute force and dictiionary atacks prevention for older servers

Try for yourself and see how easy it is

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Other IT Security aspects

If you’re interested in various aspects of server security questions you might want to check out  http://syspeace.wordpress.com and this blog where there’s quite a few articles on why and how Syspeace can help you with your everyday battle of brute force and dictionary attacks but also a few other guidelines for IT security.

Protecting your customers from brute force attacks in Cloud services or in an outsourcing company

 About brute force protection and Cloud Security and VPS (Virtual Private Servers) and outsourcing or hosted environments

Thoughts on cloud security by Juha Jurvanen @ JufCorp

If you are a Cloud Service provider or an outsourcing company and giving your customers access to various Windows services such as file access, Exchange, Exchange OWA,  Sharepoint, Citrix, RemoteApp and Terminal Server services or even VPS (Virtual Private Servers) , there are things you may want to consider.

Cloud security is often debated and it should be. There are pros and cons to each technical solution. Your customers rely on you to have your services reachable, virtually 24/7 and initially, they’ll be happy when that works.

Nowadays though , Cloud Computing has grown to be more accepted and with it a few questions are coming to life.

Your customers will eventually start asking you how you actually deal with various brute force attacks and dictionary attacks to protect their data. You will also , sooner or later, be faced with questions of reporting of these attacks and to be able to gather various reports of when and from where a specific user was logged in,

Remember that you customers have moved from an inhouse hosted environment where they had the ability to gather this intel themselves and they will be expecting to be able to get it from you. They also had the ability to use Syspeace to protect them but once they’ve shifted to your services, they have absolutely no idea of what security mechanisms you have in place for them and these questions will start to come around.

Historically, it’s been very difficult to handle these situations (feel free to read earlier post on this blog to see what I’m getting at for instance  http://syspeace.wordpress.com/2012/10/21/securing-your-webmailowa-on-microsoft-exchange-and-a-few-other-tips/ and http://syspeace.wordpress.com/2012/10/16/various-brute-force-prevention-methods-for-windows-servers-pros-and-cons/ ) so many sysadmins have just more or less given up but when we’re moving to Cloud Services and Cloud Computing, people will expect that also these matters should be sorted. The issue is “why should we move our data to something we can’t even control or know how the security is set up or verify it easily ? ”

Sooner or later, the end users and customers will start testing how your response really is and verify if there are any mechanisms in place (sometimes out of curiosity and sometimes due to internal processes and audits).

Is their attacked account locked out ? For how long ? Is the attacking IP locked out ? Can you as a Cloud Service provider contact the user and let them know that someone tried to user their account from an IP address in China , although you know the customer has no business in China? Do you alert you customers about it ?

No, probably not and it’s easy to understand why.

Because all of this has required  a lot manual work so most service providers and outsourcing companies just don’t want to deal with the problem and tend to not talk about the actual problem, being basically, they have no idea on important stuff such as from where a login attempt was made, what username was used and how was it handled? Was it successful or a failed attempt and how many times did the attacker actually try ?

If you are a Cloud Computing Service provider I highly suggest you have a look at Syspeace to enable you to add this service for your customers and protect access to your Cloud services preemptively and actually have these things handled automatically, without increasing your workload but still tightening your security and to a very low cost.

If you’re a VPS provider, consider for instance having the Syspeace software pre installed in your images and let your customers know it’s there so they themselves can decide whether to use it or not. It’s not an extra cost for you but it does show your customers that you’re actually thinking about their security and that you’re thinking ahead.

So far, Syspeace has actually saved 4.3 M US$ in only a few months in costs for the manual workload associated with brute force attacks and dictionary attacks.

I believe that the service providers that start thinking about these things and take them seriously will have an advantage to those who don’t and quite a few will take having a system such as Syspeace in place for granted, as you would with antivirus.

Have a look at the Syspeace website and see for yourself how quickly and easily you can implement a brute force prevention system without the usual costs of appliances or costly consultants.

Today we reached over +200 000 blocked brute force attempts on Windows servers worldwide – Syspeace

Syspeace  helps Windows administrators handle the gruesome tasks of tracking, blocking and reporting brute force attacks on Windows servers.

Through the use of the GBL (Global BlackList) Syspeace users are preemptively protected from brute force attacks so to be honest, the number could actually be higher than 200 000 so far since the attackers once reported into the GBL are alreday blocked and thus not reported again into Syspeace.

Syspeace monitors incorrect login attempts on Windows servers, Exchange Servers, Citrix Server, Terminal Servers, Exchange OWA, Terminal Server RDWEB and more

Download a free trial of Syspeace and see for yourself how easily you can prevent intrusion attempts on your Windows server and cut your costs on administration. Installation and configuration within minutes. After installation and starting up the Syspeace service you are instantly protected..

And no additional assembly required.

No need for new and specialized hardware with runaway licensing costs,no need changing all of your infrastructure to implement a new IDS/IPS system and no costly security consultants. It’s just that easy.

Syspeace – let the silence do the talking

Syspeace - Brute force protection for Windows servers

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